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๐ŸŽ“ Learn BetonQuest

There are two ways to get started with BetonQuest:

  1. Full beginner guide: A step-by-step tutorial to learn everything you need to know in an order which makes sense to a new BetonQuest user.
  2. Quick-Start-Tutorial: Provides a brief overview about the building blocks. Recommended for experienced plugin scripters and programmers.

Full beginner guide Quick start tutorial

Checking out the "default" example quest.๐Ÿ”—

Let's start by checking out the build in example quest. You can find it in the BetonQuest directory that has been generated in your plugins folder. The folder you are looking for is named "default".

Open it up and find a file called main.yml. It contains a lot of options, but you only need to look at this section:

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npcs:
  '0': innkeeper
You will need to change the '0' to the ID of the Citizens NPC you want to learn Beton with. You obtain a NPC's ID by selecting it with /npc sel while looking at it and then running /npc id.
Execute /q reload and right-click the NPC.

The conversation should start. If it did not, check if you correctly assigned the ID. Ask the Innkeeper for some quests. He will tell you to cut some trees. If you want, type /journal to get the journal and see a new entry. Now, don't try to place any wood blocks. BetonQuest will detect that and increase the number of blocks to destroy. Just go and find some trees that you can cut down. Now you can return to the Innkeeper and give him the wood. You will receive the reward.

Using events and conditions๐Ÿ”—

Now that you know how a (very) simple quest looks like time to start learning how to write something similar. Let's start with events. We won't do conversations just now, since they heavily use events and conditions, so you need to know them first. You can read complete reference to events in the Reference chapter. Do that now or just continue with this tutorial.

Events๐Ÿ”—

Let's just open events.yml file inside the default package. Add a new line at the bottom:

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mega: "notify Hello world!"

This is an event instruction. BetonQuest will use it to determine what type of event is used and what exactly it should do. mega is the event's name, notify is the events type and Hello world! tells the notify event what it needs to display. In this case, if you run mega event, it will display Hello world! as a chat message. Now save the file, issue /q reload command and run the event with /q e {name} default.mega command (q is shortcut for quest, e is shortcut for event, {name} is your Minecraft name without the brackets, default is the package/quest and mega is the name of the event we've just created). It should show you a Hello world! notification in the chat.

Let's create another event, a more complicated one. teleport seems complicated enough. As you can read in the Events list, it needs a single argument, the location. Press F3 and check out your current location (it's shown on the left, three numbers, x, y and z). Now add in events.yml another line:

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tp: "teleport 100;200;300;world"

and replace 100 with your x coordinate, 200 with y and 300 with z. world needs to be replaced with your current world's name. Save the file, reload the plugin (/q reload) and run this event with a command described before. It should teleport you to the location you have specified.

Congratulations, you have just created your first events. Go ahead and do some experiments with other event types. You can find them in Events list chapter. Once you're done let's start learning conditions.

Conditions๐Ÿ”—

Open the conditions.yml file and add a new line:

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mega: "location 100;200;300;world 5"

Can you see how we named the mega condition in the same way as the mega event? They are not connected in any way. Condition names and event names are separated, so you can give them the same name without any problems. Now let's look at the instruction string. As you can suspect, location is a type of the condition. This one means that we'll be checking if the player is near that location (you should change the location to the place where you're standing right now, so you don't have to run around the world). Note that at the end of location argument there is an additional number, 5. This is the maximum distance you can be away from the location to meet the condition. Alright, save the file and reload the plugin.

Now walk to the location you have defined in the condition. Try to stand on the exact block corresponding to that location. Issue /q c {name} default.mega command (c is shortcut for condition). It should show you "Condition blah blah blah: true". We're focusing on that last word, true. This means that you're meeting the condition: you're standing within 5 block radius of the location. Now move 2 blocks away and issue that command again. You should still be meeting the condition. Walk 4 more blocks away and try now. It should show false. You are now outside of that 5 block radius. Get it? Great.

Now I'll show you the simplest use of those conditions. Open the events.yml file again, and at the end of mega instruction add conditions:mega argument. By the way, rename your events to something that actually fits the type of the event, otherwise it will get confusing really fast. Example:

# This is a comment btw
# Old:
mega: "notify Hello world!"

# New:
sayHello: "notify Hello world! conditions:isAtSpawn"
# Old:
mega: "location 100;200;300;world 5"

# New:
isAtSpawn: "location 100;200;300;world 5"

Now sayHello event will run only if it meets isAtSpawn condition. Reload the plugin, walk outside of the 5 block radius and try to run sayHello event. Puff, nothing happens. It's because you're not meeting isAtSpawn condition. Walk into the radius again and try to run that event now. It should happily display the Hello world! notification.

It's very nice that we can add such conditions, but the problem is: what if you wanted to display the notification only if the player is outside the radius? Don't worry, you don't have to specify inverted_location condition or anything like that. You can simply negate the condition. Negation makes the condition behave in the exact opposite way, in this case it isAtSpawn will be met only if the player is outside of the 5 block radius, and it won't be met if he's inside. Open the events.yml and add an exclamation mark before the isAtSpawn condition, so it looks like this:

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sayHello: "notify Hello world! conditions:!isAtSpawn"

This means "display the Hello world! notification if the isAtSpawn condition is not met". Save the file, reload the plugin and run the event inside and outside of the radius to see how it works.

Basic tags๐Ÿ”—

Now that you know how to use events and conditions I'll show you what tags are. Create new events:

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add_beton_tag: "tag add beton"
del_beton_tag: "tag del beton"

It's a good practice to give your events names that describe what they are doing. Imagine you have 100 events, foo24, bar65, baz12 etc. You would get lost pretty quickly. So, add_beton_tag event here simply adds beton tag to the player, del_beton_tag removes it. Save the file, reload the plugin and run this event. Nothing happens... or does it? Issue /q t {name} command (t is shortcut for tags). It should show you a list with few entries. Right now focus on default.beton, the rest are used by the default quest for Innkeeper. Alright, default is the name of the package in which the tag is, and beton is the name of the tag, as defined in add_beton_tag event. Now run del_beton_tag event. Guess what, default.beton disappeared from the list! And that's it, you know how to add and remove tags. Pretty useless.

Nothing could be more wrong. Tags are one the most powerful things in BetonQuest. They just need to be used with tag condition. Open conditions.yml and add

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has_beton_tag: "tag beton"

line. As you can imagine, tag is the type of condition (the same as tag event, but these are not the same things - one is an event, the other one is a condition) and beton is the name of the tag. You don't have to specify default.beton, but you can if you want. Now save, reload and check it with a command. It should show false, since you have removed the tag with del_beton_tag event. Add it again with add_beton_tag event and check the has_beton_tag condition again. Now it will show true.

Now you probably understand how powerful this system is. You could for example set a tag on the first time the player talks with an NPC, and if the NPC sees that tag next time they talk, he will tell something different, like "welcome back".

Creating objectives๐Ÿ”—

Time to write some objectives! Open the objectives.yml file and add a new line:

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kill_creepers: "mobkill CREEPER 3 events:tp conditions:has_beton_tag"

Now let's analyze it. kill_creepers is a name of the objective. mobkill is a type. In this case, to complete the objective the player will have to kill some mobs. creeper is a type of the mob, so we know that these mobs will have to be Creepers. 3 is the amount. It means that the player has to kill 3 Creepers. events:tp means than once the player kills those Creepers, the tp event will be run. conditions:has_beton_tag tells us that the player will have to have beton tag while killing Creepers to complete the objective. Save it, reload the plugin and issue /q o {name} add default.kill_creepers command (o is for objective, add tells the plugin to add an objective).

Now you can check if you actually have this objective with /q o {name} command, it will show you all your active objectives. It should show default.kill_creepers. Alright, remove (yes, remove!) the beton tag from you and find some Creepers to kill. Once you killes 3 of them you will notice that nothing happened. It's because has_beton_tag condtion is not met, so the objective does not count your progress. Now add the tag again and kill another Creepers. When the third is dead you should be teleported to the location defined in tp event.

Congratulations, now you know how to use objectives. You should experiment with other types now, since objectives will be used very often in your quests. Once you're done check out the Writing your first conversation chapter to use your knowledge to write your fisrt conversation.

Writing your first conversation๐Ÿ”—

Now that you have seen BetonQuest in action and understood events, conditions and objectives, it's time for writing your first conversation. There's a conversations directory inside the default package. It contains a single file, innkeeper.yml. This is the conversation with Innkeeper, the one who asks you to cut some trees. Open it, we'll use that for reference. Now create a new file, let's say miner.yml. Now type (don't copy-paste it, you'll learn better while typing) that into the file:

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quester: Miner
first: greeting
NPC_options:
  greeting:
    text: Hi there, traveler!

It's the most basic conversation possible. The NPC named Miner upon starting the conversation will use greeting option, which means he will say Hi there, traveler!. Then the conversation will end, because there are no player options defined. Now you need to link the conversation with an NPC. For that you now need to create or select another NPC. Then you link your conversation to the npc in the main.yml file. Open it now. As you can see the previous NPC conversation is linked to Innkeeper word. Now add another line under the Innkeeper: '1': miner, save the file and reload the server. This will link our new conversation with the NPC with the id "1". Now click on that NPC.

Guess what, the conversation finished right after it started. The Miner just said Hi there, traveler!, as expected. Now go to the conversation file and edit it (again, manually, no copy-paste!) so the options look like this:

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NPC_options:
  greeting:
    text: Hi there, traveler!
    pointers: hello,bye
player_options:
  hello:
    text: Hello!
  bye:
    text: I need to go, sorry.

When you save the file, reload the plugin and start the conversation again you will notice that there are two options for you to choose: Hello! and I need to go, sorry. Choosing any of them will end the conversation, because these options did not specify any pointers.

Now add a new NPC option, for example weather with text Nice weather. and make hello player option point to it. When you save&reload, the Miner should say Nice weather. when you tell him Hello!. I think you get how it works.

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NPC_options:
  greeting:
    text: Hi there, traveler!
    pointers: hello,bye
  weather:
    text: Nice weather.
player_options:
  hello:
    text: Hello!
    pointer: weather
  bye:
    text: I need to go, sorry.

Now, every time you talk to the Miner, he will say the same thing. It would be nice if the second time you talk to him he knew your name. We can do that with tags. Define a meet_miner event and has_met_miner condition. When you talk to the Miner for the first time, he will check if you have met him. If not, he will meet you (with that event) and next time you talk, the condition will be passed and he will use your name.

Now, rename greeting NPC option to first_greeting. Add meet_miner event and negated has_met_miner condition (negated because this option should only show if the player has not met the Miner yet). You will need to surround the condition with '', because strings cannot start with exclamation marks in YAML. It should look like this:

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first: first_greeting
NPC_options:
  first_greeting:
    text: Hi there, traveler!
    condition: '!has_met_miner'
    event: meet_miner
    pointers: hello,bye 

This means: first_greeting should be used if the player does not pass has_met_miner condition (meaning he doesn't have a tag because he haven't talked to the NPC yet). When this option is used, it will fire meet_miner event and display hello and bye options. Alright, but what happens if the player met the Miner and now negated has_met_miner condition doesn't work? NPC will try to use next option defined in first setting. There is none yet, so let's add it.

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first: first_greeting,regular_greeting
NPC_options:
  regular_greeting:
    text: Hi %player%!
    pointers: hello,bye

This option does not have any conditions, so if the first_greeting fails, the NPC will always choose this one. Now take a look at the %player% thing. It's a variable. In this place it will show your name. There are more than this one, they are described in Reference chapter. Alright, save&reload and start the conversation. If you did everything correctly, the Miner should greet you as a "traveler", and the second time you talk to him, he should greet you with your Minecraft name.

Here's the whole conversation you created, so you can check if you understood everything correctly:

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first: first_greeting,regular_greeting
NPC_options:
  first_greeting:
    text: Hi there, traveler!
    condition: '!has_met_miner'
    event: meet_miner
    pointers: hello,bye 
  regular_greeting:
    text: Hi %player%!
    pointers: hello,bye
  weather:
    text: Nice weather.
player_options:
  hello:
    text: Hello!
    pointer: weather
  bye:
    text: I need to go, sorry.

Now you should experiment some more with this conversation, you can help yourself by looking at the innkeeper.yml file. Try to understand how that conversation works step by step. As the excercise you should complete the Miner NPC, so he asks you to mine some iron ore, then smelt it in the furnace, next craft an armor with it and return to him wearing this armor.

You might want to check out the Reference chapter to see how to handle items in your quests and how to add entries to the journal. If you want to use Citizens NPCs instead of the ones made with clay you will find information you need in that chapter too. To find out more about events, conditions, objectives and variables, take a look at the appropriate lists (after the Reference chapter).


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